Everything you need to know about London Fashion Week Men’s Spring/Summer 2019

London Fashion Week Men’s is just around the corner and here’s all you need to know to stay in the loop (so far).

Friday 9 June sees the beginning of London Fashion Week Men’s Spring/Summer 2019, which is now entering its 12th season. Running from Friday to Monday, the schedule is looking more exciting than ever with a whole host of new designers joining the roster.

Typically the four-day showcase will see some of our best homegrown talent (Oliver Spencer and A Cold Wall will all be returning), but there is also an array of some of the best overseas talent. Brands like Xander Zhou, Chalayan and Astrid Andersen have become firm favourites on the fashion week schedule and will be showing us what they’ve got in store for this time next year.

While little has been altered with regards to how fashion week will run (the BFC Showspace is still over at 180 Strand), there have been a few changes. GQ favourite Daniel W Fletcher will be putting on a show rather than a presentation as he has done in previous seasons, while Iceberg is joining the LFWM schedule for the first time. Kent & Curwen (you know, the one fronted and co-owned by David Beckham) is ditching its luncheon of the past few years and instead putting on an intimate show.

There will be parties aplenty, with Asos kicking things off on the Friday night (it’ll also be showing its own collection for SS19). Friday will also see Burberry put on an exclusive party with GQ Woman Of The Year Adwoa Aboah and her model mate Sonny Hall presenting the Autumn/Winter 18 pre-collection. On Sunday night GQ Style will be throwing its own bash with Browns in celebration of London Fashion Week Men’s, while on the Monday night Dylan Jones and British GQ are enlisting Loyle Carner to host the official closing dinner.

If you can’t be at fashion week in person, then we’ll obviously be bringing you all the action as and when it happens. Sure there’s plenty going on over at the showspaces, but we’ve also got our own roving photographer Robert Spangle catching the very best street style and we’ll be bringing you daily style diaries with our favourite influencers.

Below we present to you the full schedule for London Fashion Week Men’s Spring/Summer 2019 and remember to tune in to our Instagram and of course, GQ.co.uk, when the shows kick off…

LONDON FASHION WEEK MEN’S SPRING/SUMMER ’19 SCHEDULE

Friday 8 June:
18:00 Iceberg (show)
18:30-20:00 Kirk Originals – Made in England – A London Story (event)
19:00-21:00 Asos Menswear (presentation)
19:30-21:00 Machine A & Void present The Graduate Project (event)

Saturday 9 June:
09:00 Daniel W Fletcher (show)
09:30-10:30 CV22 – Rugby – England (Discovery Lab)
10:00 John Lawrence Sullivan (show)
10:30-11:30 E Tautz (presentation)
11:00 St James’s Show (show)
11:30-13:30 Lou Dalton (presentation)
12:30-14:30 3.Paradis X Pony (Discovery Lab)
13:00 Edward Crutchley (show)
14:00 Matthew Miller (show)
14:30-16:30 Wood Wood (presentation)
15:00 Oliver Spencer (show)
15:30-17:30 Jordanluca (Discovery Lab)
16:00 Sharon Wauchob (show)
16:30-17:30 Bethany Williams (presentation)
17:00 Liam Hodges (show)
17:30-18:30 Ben Sherman (presentation)
18:00 Qasimi (show)
18:30-19:30 New Gen One To Watch: Bianca Saunders (Discovery Lab)
19:30-23:30 Labrum Presentation supported by Asics Tiger (event)

Sunday 10 June:
09:30-11:30 Phoebe English (presentation)
10:00 Xander Zhou (show)
10:30-12:30 Something To Hate On (Discovery Lab)
11:00 A Cold Wall (show)
12:00 MAN (show)
13:00 Chalayan (show)
13:00-15:00 New Gen pop-up showroom: A Cold Wall (event)
13:30-14:30 Kent & Curwen (presentation)
14:30-16:30 Danshan (Discovery Lab)
15:00 Christopher Raeburn (show)
15:30-17:30 Michiko Koshino (presentation)
16:00 Alex Mullins (show)
16:00-18:00 New Gen pop-up showroom: Phoebe English (event)
17:00 Kiko Kostadinov (show)
18:00 Berthold (show)
19:00 Cottweiler (show)
20:00 Martine Rose (show)
20:30-22:30 Discipled: Julian Sinclair & Alin Cotovanu

Monday 11 June:
09:30-11:00 New Gen pop-up showroom: Liam Hodges (event)
09:30-11:30 Ka Wa Key (Discovery Lab)
10:00 Per Gotesson (show)
11:00 Private Policy and Staff Only presented by 智族GQ (show)
11:30-13:00 Barbour International (presentation)
11:30-15:30 Astrid Anderson (presentation)
12:00 Pronounce (show)
12:00-17:00 New Gen pop-up showroom: Per Gotesson (event)
12:30-13:30 Nine8 Collective (Discovery Lab)
13:00 Charles Jeffery Loverboy (show)
13:30-15:30 Nicholas Daley (presentation)
14:00 University Of Westminster MA Menswear (show)
14:30-16:30 Mr Start (DiscoveryLAB)
15:00 Blindness (show)
15:30-17:30 New Gen One To Watch: Paria/Farzaneh (presentation)
17:00 What We Wear (show)
19:00 GQ Dinner co-hosted by Loyle Carner (event)

 

 

 

 

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Can You Wear Bike Shorts to the Club?

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Photo: Getty Images

The above-the-knee bike short has been quietly rumbling on the runways since Fall 2014 during Chanel couture; for Spring 2018, it made appearances at the likes of Alexander Wang, MSGM, and Off-White. Predictably, the usual street style stars like Kim Kardashian West and Emily Ratajkowski have been sporting the stretchy glute-huggers casually, out and about during the daytime. Now, though, the heretofore casual piece has received a big-night-out makeover thanks to Bella Hadid. Last week at the Cannes Film Festival, the model was snapped en route to a party wearing a pair of flashy metallic Yeezy x 2XU shorts that she paired with a crop top and a backpack. The elevating factors were a statement diamond necklace and drop earrings, and most of all, a pair of high heels.

The micro-leggings look is, of course, a tough one to pull off. Bike shorts are to thighs as thong heels are to feet and toes: They show everything. But then again, that’s the whole point—and what’s more, they’re a fresh, tomboyish alternative to the typical slinky party dress. Vogue Market Editor Alexandra Gurvitch has long been leaning into the look. “They are perfect for showing your legs. It’s body-con and spandex, which is actually super-flattering. They hold you in. And another benefit is that you don’t have to be girly at the club in a dress,” she says. “Plus, they are easy to dress up in a very now way. Instead of making them ’80s by sporting them under a big top, you should go early noughties and wear them with a going-out top and sexy heels.”

Here, see the best ways to take bike shorts for a spin when you’re nowhere near a bike.

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The fallacy of the plus-size industry

In this week’s ‘For Style’s Sake’, we explore the fallacy of the plus-size industry and whether inclusivity is nothing but smoke and mirrors.

The fallacy of the plus-size industry (Pulse)

For Style’s Sake explores the fallacy of the burgeoning plus-size industry and examines whether plus-size models are a true representation of ‘the average woman’ or whether we have just been sold another dream parading as ‘the answer’.

For years, plus-size women were marginalised by the mainstream fashion industry despite a large percentage of women worldwide being over a US size 10. According to a study from the International Journal of Fashion Design, Technology and Education, the average American woman is between a size 16 to 18.

As society progressed and more marginalised groups are refusing to be ignored any longer, we noticed a shift and now brands are striving to be inclusive but how plus-size is plus-size?

According to the industry, plus-size is anything above a size 8. The majority of plus size models are no bigger than a UK size 12 and brands are projecting an image of largess that in reality isn’t very big at all. Again, bigger women find themselves of on the fringe of the very industry designed for them, or so they are told.

Years ago, plus-size women the world over struggled to find stylish, on-trend clothing. The fashion industry clung to the notion that bigger women just were not interested in fashion and brands, both high-street and high-end seldom catered for the demographic and those that did, did not provide anything fashion-forward. A subculture grew from the sheer frustration at the lack of options for bigger women and that’s how to plus-size fashion industry really grew its wings.

Plus-size brands began to spring up that catered solely to bigger women and not just any type of clothing, but clothing that closely mirrored what we saw in magazines and on models. It was such a powerful statement for the plus-size community who declared that their size had no bearing on their taste and the type of clothing they wanted to wear.

The plus-size industry thrived.

Mango launches plus-size range Violeta using ‘plus-size’ models (Mango)

Mainstream brands, keen to key into burgeoning markets noticed this and turned their attention to it. Slowly but surely, brands began to release plus-size capsule collections, first dipping their toes to test the waters. It was more lucrative than they could have possibly imagined.

On runways, in stores, even in the pages of style bibles such as Vogue magazinethe plus-size woman is finally getting some fashion respect, not because the industry has decided it’s OK to be big, but because it can no longer afford to ignore her. Retailers must find ways to grow and this is an irresistible market for them to tap into.

Plus-size model Ashley Graham bags the cover of UK Vogue shot by renowned photographer Patrick Demarchelier (Vogue)

However, it has quickly became clear that whilst they were projecting the idea of inclusivity, these brands talking the talk but not walking the walk.

There of course has been a paradigm shift somewhat, though not enough, as darker-skinned models, like Philomena Kwao, have not only found work but have also been massively successful in a market that was easing into the mainstream. Today the plus-size industry has, in many ways, eclipsed the fashion industry overall in its diversity and inclusivity. However, those stories are few and far between and for the most part, the plus-size industry has been merely co-opted by the main fashion industry and is trying to push a narrative that is not very far removed from the days of old.

The majority of plus-size models that are being promoted as such are barely above a size 12. The industry has managed to pervert what it means to be a plus-size model and are possibly causing more harm than good for the plus-size community. Women, looking at adverts are expecting to see models that they can finally relate to and in reality are seeing models who further compound their body image issues and cause them to question where exactly they belong, if anywhere at all.

Alex LaRosa, a self-proclaimed “plus-size model who’s visibly plus-size,” appeared on Huffpost Live to talk about some of her issues with these discrepancies:

In a world where you’re telling women that plus-size is sizes 4 and up, you’re causing body image issues. You’re causing unrealistic expectations that everyone, every woman, should be a size 4. To bring that into the plus-size community, where you’re using sizes 8, 10 and 12, when sometimes the stores don’t even start carrying the clothes until size 14, you’re telling women, ‘You want to look like these models. This is what you should look like, but it’s never going to happen.

Plus-size model Alex LaRosa
Plus-size model Alex LaRosa (Alex LaRosa)

The sad truth is plus-sized models’ bodies are headed in the opposite direction of actual plus-size women’s bodies.

Speaking to online platform The Revelist, plus-size model Tess Holliday spoke about how far the industry needs to go to recognise real women with different body shapes as well as sizes. She said:

I’m part of one of those under-represented, unseen groups: plus-size women. And I’m incredibly proud to be the first woman of my size (size 22) to be signed to a major modelling agency, and recognise that it was a milestone for an industry that is typically focused on thinness.

But right now, even in the plus-size part of the modelling world, there isn’t a ton of diversity in body shapes. Most plus-size models are taller than 5’8”, a size 10 or 12, and have an hourglass shape. Where are the other bodies with the shape of a blueberry, like mine? And where are the women with small busts or small butts?  

Change will only come, to models and beyond, if women keep demanding it.

Plus-size model and body positive activist Tess Holliday

Indeed, the plus-size industry has a long way to go to actually capture what it means to be a true plus-size woman. For many women who thought this movement would be the beginning of the end of years of otherness have found themselves once again, excluded.

Thanks to social media, voices reach further and the people have a platform to push their narratives and as Tess Holliday suggested, change will only come if it’s demanded.

The fashion industry might never be what we need it to be for every individual which is why it important that we understand the importance of creating our own narratives and being the change we wish to see.

 

 

 

 

Hold Up — Did You See the Practical Summer Dress Kate Middleton Wore to the Wedding Rehearsal?

 

Kate Middleton joined Prince William and the now-newlyweds Meghan Markle and Prince Harry for a wedding rehearsal in Windsor. While this marked the duchess’s first public drive through town since giving birth to baby Louis, she appeared bright — and that probably had something to do with her dress.

Kate chose a lovely floral Michael Michael Kors shirtdress ($175) for the occasion, which is a breezy number that was probably pretty comfortable for the day’s agenda. The duchess accessorized with oversize Givenchy sunglasses.

While Meghan opted for an ivory bodysuit blouse and gorgeous diamonds to prepare for the ceremony, Kate’s laid-back, free-spirited outfit is definitely our speed this time of year. Read on for another glimpse, then check out Kate’s exact design and shop plenty of similar looks. Plus, see what Kate ended up wearing to Meghan and Harry’s ceremony!

 

 

Paris Hilton shines in gold gown while showing off engagement ring at Cannes Fashion For Relief gala

Paris Hilton wowed in a gold sleeveless gown on Sunday night at the Cannes Fashion For Relief gala.

The 37-year-old Hilton heiress, who came dripping in diamonds, showed off her 20-carat, pear shaped engagement ring on the red carpet.

Fashion For Relief is a non-profit organization, lead by supermodel Naomi Campbell, that raises money for various causes.

Pretty princess: Paris Hilton wowed in a gold sleeveless gown by Christophe Guillarme on Sunday night at the Cannes Fashion For Relief gala

Pretty princess: Paris Hilton wowed in a gold sleeveless gown by Christophe Guillarme on Sunday night at the Cannes Fashion For Relief gala

What a rock: The 37-year-old Hilton heiress, who came dripping in diamonds, showed off her 20-carat, pear shaped engagement ring on the red carpet

What a rock: The 37-year-old Hilton heiress, who came dripping in diamonds, showed off her 20-carat, pear shaped engagement ring on the red carpet

Bling: Paris couldn't stop staring at her massive diamond 

Bling: Paris couldn’t stop staring at her massive diamond

The evening of glitz and glamour included a guest list of over 1,000 people.

Attendees enjoyed dinner, live entertainment, an auction, and a fashion show.

Hilton, who traveled to Cannes with fiance Chris Zylka, flew solo for the event.

Giving back: Fashion For Relief is a non-profit organization, lead by supermodel Naomi Campbell, that raises money for various causes

Giving back: Fashion For Relief is a non-profit organization, lead by supermodel Naomi Campbell, that raises money for various causes

All smiles: Hilton paired her ring with a diamond watch and choker  

All smiles: Hilton paired her ring with a diamond watch and choker

Cannes club: Paris is set to host and DJ a party at the VIP Room on Monday night in France 

Paris is set to host and DJ a party at the VIP Room on Monday night.

She made her DJ debut back in June 2012 and currently has a residency at Amnesia nightclub in Ibiza.

‘My first show was in Brazil. Like 30,000 people, closing for Jennifer Lopez, it was so much fun,’ she told Billboard in an interview.

‘I loved it so much that after that I really just got more into it. I’ve just been having the time of my life. I didn’t realize what a huge success I would be.’

Front row: The evening of glitz and glamour included a guest list of over 1,000 people

Front row: The evening of glitz and glamour included a guest list of over 1,000 people

Do a twirl: Paris, who traveled to Cannes with fiance Chris Zylka, flew solo for the event 

Do a twirl: Paris, who traveled to Cannes with fiance Chris Zylka, flew solo for the event

Fashion For Relief: Attendees enjoyed dinner, live entertainment, an auction, and a fashion show throughout the evening 

Fashion For Relief: Attendees enjoyed dinner, live entertainment, an auction, and a fashion show throughout the evening

The Simple Life star is in the process of planning her wedding to Zylka, 32.

During the iHeartRadio Music Awards, she revealed to ET that the pair plan to tie the knot later this year, but noted that picking a date has proved difficult due to her large family.

‘First we have the engagement party, the bridal party, and then the wedding,’ she said. ‘We’re still picking a date that’s perfect for everyone in the family. My brother is getting married in June so we’re gonna separate a few more months after that.’

The Royal Wedding: Dresses, Hats, and More

Royal weddings are an opportunity for Europe’s royals, and a handful of A-list stars, to break out the fashion they don’t get a chance to wear anywhere else. Ahead, a look at the most notable looks from Harry and Meghan’s wedding.

Doria Ragland, Prince Charles and Camilla
By Jane Barlow/WPA Pool/Getty Images.

What Should French Fashion Do With Its Unsold Clothing?

A circular economy incentive to prohibit brands from discarding unsold clothing means luxury and high street retailers need to rethink their practices.