9 Must-Try Summer Fashion Trends That Clueless Predicted

As if! Say you were born the day Clueless opened in theaters across America—July 19, 1995. You would be 22 today, or way older than Cher, Tai, and Dionne as they strode the halls of Bronson Alcott High School.

Feel ancient now? Consider this: It is over 200 years since Jane Austen wroteEmma, on which this iconic teenage film is based. She describes her heroine as a girl “no one but myself will much like,” and introduces her in the first lines of the book as: “handsome, clever, and rich,” which kind of sums up Cherilyn “Cher” Horowitz as well. Transporting Emma’s action from an English manor house to a mansion in Beverley Hills, Clueless tells the timeless story of young matchmaking gone awry—though Austen never had Emma say, “She’s my friend because we both know what it’s like to have people be jealous of us,” as Cher explains in one of her many enlightening aperçus.

And another thing: Austen’s damsels may have muddled while clad in flimsy muslin frocks, but the outfits worn by Clueless’s heroines are far closer to ourown hearts. As luck—and fashion—would have it, so many of the mainstays of Cluelessare showing up again on runways, store racks, and city streets.

Happy anniversary Clueless! So get out those slip dresses, slap on those chokers, cuddle up in your pastel athleisure! Then tear open a bag of Skinny Pop, crank up the air-conditioning, pay $3.99 to have Amazon stream the movie into your laptop, and spend a perfect evening in the company of Baldwins and virgins who can’t drive.

Here, our guide to the enduring fashions of Clueless.

SHOPDEALMAN

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MoMa’s First Fashion Exhibition In 73 Years Showcases Everyday Clothing

It’s been over seven decades, but a fashion exhibit is finally making its way into the hallowed halls of New York’s Museum of Modern Art.
According to The Hollywood Reporter, Items: Is Fashion Modern?, will be the first fashion-related show at the museum since Are Clothes Modern, an exhibit from 1944.
Unlike the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual Costume institute exhibit, which focuses on a specific designer or cerebral theme, Items: Is Fashion Modern? will shed the spotlight on more everyday fashion items. The collection will include 111 different pieces, with a special focus on items that have had a long-lasting impact on American culture at large.
Some of the standout pieces are things that people encounter out in the real world, like Levi’s 501 jeans, Converse All-Stars, and Calvin Klein briefs. But it’s because they’ve become everyday items that they’re in the exhibition. Instead of shining a rarified light on couture, the show is hoping to bring common items into a different context.
There are some high-concept pieces in the exhibit, however. Issey Miyake’s A-POC, a long, continuous dress that several models wore simultaneously, and Moon Boots will be on display in an area focusing on size and form. To bring things back to Earth, a Wonderbra will sit alongside those two items. Little black dresses and pieces associated with “power,” like suiting and a Hermès Birkin bag will also be included.
To illustrate modesty, senior curator Paola Antonelli included a range of clothing pieces that span a variety of cultures, including a hijab, a bikini, a very timely slip dress, and leather pants.
The exhibition is set to open on October 1 and will run through January 28, 2018.

Food, fashion combine at 4-H Review

4-H members participating in fashion projects were (from left) Missouri Brown, Rachel Jackson, Melinda Lawson, Gabrielle Beeler, Kelsey Kimes, Caitlin Carr and Maylee Barringer.

POMEROY — Friday evening marked the first 4-H Review featuring clothing projects, which were formerly part of the Style Review, as well as Cloverbud Show and Tell and the Emerald Chef competition.

The evening began with a program by the Food and Fashion Board, along with some audience participation. The group told a story of a pig, one word at a time, making for a unique and funny story.

The Cloverbuds then took to the microphone to share some of what they have been working on throughout the year. Adyn Monroe told about learning to cut his own fishing rod, and going fishing. He told the audience that fishing with the stick fishing rod was better than a normal fishing rod. e

Cloverbuds from the Cowboy Boots and Country Roots 4-H club explained how they learned the 4-H Pledge and what they did for each part of the pledge.

Cloverbud Leland told of his trip to Old Man’s Cave and the items that he and those with him found along the way.

For Kolsyn Jenkins, her Cloverbud experience included growing her own tomato which she brought along to show and tell.

Attention then turned to the older 4-H members, with judging results announced for the fashion and food projects, as well as the 4-H members modeling their fashion projects.

In addition, Gabrielle Beeler, Kyra Zuspan and Madison Dailey each gave presentations about their respective 4-H projects.

Fashion

Creative Costumes — Kelsey Kimes, Grand Champion;

Sundresses and Jumpers — Maylee Barringer, Grand Champion; Melinda Lawson, Reserve Champion;

Outerwear for Anywhere — Caitlin Carr, Grand Champion;

Shopping Savvy — Gabrielle Beeler, Grand Champion; Missouri Brown, Reserve Champion;

You Can Quilt — Rachel Jackson, Grand Champion.

Food

Let’s Start Cooking — Elizabeth Spires, Grand Champion; Hannah Jackson, Reserve Champion; Trinity Wood, Honorable Mention;

Let’s Bake Quick Breads — Elisabeth Oldaker, Grand Champion; Maylee Barringer, Reserve Champion; Dannett Davis, Honorable Mention; Alivia Heldreth, Honorable Mention;

Yeast Breads on the Rise — Katlyn Barber, Grand Champion;

Global Gourmet — Marissa Brooker, Grand Champion; Addie McDaniel, Reserve Champion; Kyra Zuspan, Honorable Mention;

Racing the Clock on Awesome Meals — Meghan Short, Grand Champion; Sidney Dillon, Reserve Champion;

Sports Nutrition 1 — Addisyn Ramsburg, Grand Champion;

Science Fun with Kitchen Chemistry — Jessica Cook, Grand Champion; Hunter Clary, Reserve Champion;

Snack Attack — Adryauna Parker, Grand Champion;

Cake Decorating — Rachel Jackson, Grand Champion; Arielle Beeler, Reserve Champion.

9 Must-Try Summer Fashion Trends That Clueless Predicted

 

As if! Say you were born the day Clueless opened in theaters across America—July 19, 1995. You would be 22 today, or way older than Cher, Tai, and Dionne as they strode the halls of Bronson Alcott High School.

Feel ancient now? Consider this: It is over 200 years since Jane Austen wroteEmma, on which this iconic teenage film is based. She describes her heroine as a girl “no one but myself will much like,” and introduces her in the first lines of the book as: “handsome, clever, and rich,” which kind of sums up Cherilyn “Cher” Horowitz as well. Transporting Emma’s action from an English manor house to a mansion in Beverley Hills, Clueless tells the timeless story of young matchmaking gone awry—though Austen never had Emma say, “She’s my friend because we both know what it’s like to have people be jealous of us,” as Cher explains in one of her many enlightening aperçus.

And another thing: Austen’s damsels may have muddled while clad in flimsy muslin frocks, but the outfits worn by Clueless’s heroines are far closer to ourown hearts. As luck—and fashion—would have it, so many of the mainstays of Cluelessare showing up again on runways, store racks, and city streets.

Happy anniversary Clueless! So get out those slip dresses, slap on those chokers, cuddle up in your pastel athleisure! Then tear open a bag of Skinny Pop, crank up the air-conditioning, pay $3.99 to have Amazon stream the movie into your laptop, and spend a perfect evening in the company of Baldwins and virgins who can’t drive.

Here, our guide to the enduring fashions of Clueless.

 

MoMa’s First Fashion Exhibition In 73 Years Showcases Everyday Clothing

It’s been over seven decades, but a fashion exhibit is finally making its way into the hallowed halls of New York’s Museum of Modern Art.
According to The Hollywood Reporter, Items: Is Fashion Modern?, will be the first fashion-related show at the museum since Are Clothes Modern, an exhibit from 1944.
PHOTO: COURTESY THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK.
Unlike the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual Costume institute exhibit, which focuses on a specific designer or cerebral theme, Items: Is Fashion Modern? will shed the spotlight on more everyday fashion items. The collection will include 111 different pieces, with a special focus on items that have had a long-lasting impact on American culture at large.
Some of the standout pieces are things that people encounter out in the real world, like Levi’s 501 jeans, Converse All-Stars, and Calvin Klein briefs. But it’s because they’ve become everyday items that they’re in the exhibition. Instead of shining a rarified light on couture, the show is hoping to bring common items into a different context.
There are some high-concept pieces in the exhibit, however. Issey Miyake’s A-POC, a long, continuous dress that several models wore simultaneously, and Moon Boots will be on display in an area focusing on size and form. To bring things back to Earth, a Wonderbra will sit alongside those two items. Little black dresses and pieces associated with “power,” like suiting and a Hermès Birkin bag will also be included.
To illustrate modesty, senior curator Paola Antonelli included a range of clothing pieces that span a variety of cultures, including a hijab, a bikini, a very timely slip dress, and leather pants.
The exhibition is set to open on October 1 and will run through January 28, 2018.

The bitchiest feuds in fashion history

Last week, the fashion world was reeling from a tell-all interview with fired British Vogue fashion director Lucinda Chambers published in the academic journal Vestoj. Chambers — who had worked at Vogue for 25 years — said she hadn’t read the glossy “in years.” She lambasted shallow colleagues, deemed the clothes “irrelevant” and called a recent cover with Alexa Chung “crap.”

Such score-settling is, deliciously, de rigueur in la mode. Fashion folk may be in the beauty biz, but they’re certainly not afraid to pick fights, throw shade and undermine rivals, as these notorious feuds attest.

Karl Lagerfeld vs. Yves Saint Laurent

Peter White/Getty Images | ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images

These two designers’ feud was so legendary there’s a whole book about it (Alicia Drake’s “The Beautiful Fall”). It started in 1954, when Saint Laurent beat frenemy Lagerfeld in a competition for the next great couturier. The two would socialize but also frequently trade barbs in the press, force mutual friends to choose sides and steal one another’s boyfriends. The rivalry ended with Saint Laurent’s retirement in 2002 and eventual death in 2008.

Azzedine Alaïa vs. Anna Wintour

Although Azzedine Alaïa is one of the most respected couturiers in the world, Vogue editrix Anna Wintour hasn’t put one of his outfits in her magazine for 20 years. Alaïa, who refuses to advertise, shrugged it off until 2009, when the Met Costume Institute exhibit “Model as Muse,” which Wintour had a big hand in, left out his contributions. “Who will remember Anna Wintour in the history of fashion? No one,” he lashed out in a 2011 interview with Virgine magazine. Relations haven’t cooled: Last week, Wintour skipped Alaïa’s couture show in Paris — his first in seven years — and Vogue Runway has yet to post photos from it online.

Giorgio Armani vs. Donatella Versace

In 2015, Armani told the UK’s Sunday Times Magazine that the late Gianni Versace said to him, “I dress sluts. You dress church ladies.” Although that assessment was probably kinder to Versace than to Armani, Gianni’s little sis Donatella was not having it. She called Armani’s comments “rude and tasteless,” adding: “The only word that ever came from Gianni’s mouth was ‘glamour.’ ”

 Tyra Banks vs. Naomi Campbell

Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images | EPA/OLIVIER ANRIGO

According to Tyra Banks, Naomi Campbell bullied her early on in her career and even had her fired from jobs. In 2005, Banks invited her former nemesis on her talk show where the two found “closure.” Perhaps not surprisingly given Campbell’s well-documented anger-management issues, the detente didn’t last: In 2016, Banks told a Norwegian journalist that she was still “very scared” of her.

Giorgio Armani vs. Dolce & Gabbana

The designers have been locked in a tiff since 2009 about who first showed quilted trousers on the runway — a rather dubious distinction to be fighting over.

Elle Macpherson vs. Heidi Klum

While most women wish they could be recognized for their smarts, these two supermodels are battling over who can claim the moniker “the Body.” In 2006, Klum launched a Victoria’s Secret lingerie line by that name, noting it was her nickname.Macpherson fought back, insisting she was the original “Body.” Klum had the last laugh: She ended up taking over the older supermodel’s Intimates lingerie line as creative director in 2014.

Coco Chanel vs. Elsa Schiaparelli

Not only did Chanel consistently disparage the surrealist Italian designer Schiaparelli, she also tried to set her dress on fire, “accidentally” pushing Schiaparelli into a candelabra at a party. Schiaparelli wasn’t an innocent flower, however, referring damningly to Chanel as “that milliner.”

 

Beauty Crush: ‘The Bold Type’ Stars Spill Their Beauty and Fashion Must-Haves

Freeform/Justin Coit

If you haven’t heard of The Bold Type, Freeform’s new show set in the magazine world, you’re about to. The new comedy starring Aisha Dee(Sweet/Vicious), Meghann Fahy (One Life to Live) and Katie Stevens (from season 9 of American Idol) debuts Tuesday, July 11, and between the glitz, the glamour and the chemistry among the three lead stars, it’s bound to be a summer hit. And ahead of the premiere, the trio sat down with Us Weekly exclusively to chat about their fashion and beauty must-haves!

Stylish: This show is partially inspired by the experiences of executive producer Joanna Coles, who edited Cosmopolitan for years. Did you guy grow up reading magazines like that?

AD: I went to a very upper class conservative school, and we were not allowed to read Cosmo. But I knew they had it in the library, and I knew I wasn’t supposed to read it. So I would go in to the library because I just wanted to know things! I think as a young person you want to know about sex and you want to know about makeup and you want to know about fashion and all of that stuff and it was forbidden at the school but I found a way. Also there’s this Australian magazine called Frankie that I’ve loved for a really long time. They just have a really cool vibe.

MF: My mom, when I was in high school, owned a women’s boutique in my town. And she used to have Vogues and InStyles laying out everywhere and I used to just sit and look at all the fashion and all the stories and just sit there for hours looking at them because they’re like Bibles.

KS: I read Cosmo growing up. When I was still too young to read it, my friends would buy them at CVS and we’d cut out the things that we liked and paste it into this little book and we called it our Cosmo Diary.

Stylish: The show has such great style! Have you always been into fashion?

AD: I’ve always kind of gravitated to vintage styles and throwback-y stuff by going to thrift shops and getting clothes that way. Growing up my mother was a single mom, so that was where we got all of our things, from the thrift shop. Everything! Our TV. Our cutlery.

MF: I was known in high school, when we had sporting events, I would be the girl that would wear stilettos to school. That’s why I’m very good at walking in my shoes. My sneakers even have heels in them. I always have a lift!

KS: I’m learning a lot about makeup right now. For example this morning my makeup and hair person didn’t show up. So I was like, “Alright, let’s do this!” And I managed to pull something off. I think it’s because I’ve been getting my makeup done so much that I’m like, “OK, these are the brushes that look familiar to me. These are the motions that feel familiar to me.” I do like makeup but I don’t wear a ton of it. I buy it all the time and I don’t put it on!

Stylish: If you guys had, each of you had to pick a holy grail product, the thing you always had to have with you all the time, what would it be?

AD: A little spoolie brush. Cause my eyelashes get twisted. They’re very curly and they go down into my eye!

MF: Me, too! I have eyelash extensions so spoolies are important for my brows and my lashes. I don’t wear eyelash extensions all the time — just for filming. But it’s a great accessory to have because I can wake up in the morning and I feel like a little bit done because my lashes look so full and great. I would also say Chapstick. Never know when you’re gonna need to pucker up!

KS: For me, Fresh makes these lip tints and there’s a rose-colored one that I’m obsessed with because it smells really good and it’s the perfect amount of red but you can wear it literally anytime and it’s so smooth.

Stylish: Any must-haves for hair?

KS: Bumble and bumble dry shampoo! It’s the best dry shampoo that I have come into contact with and I’ve tried a lot of dry shampoos. It smells really good. You just shake it into your hair and it’s amazing.

MF: I would say texture spray because sometimes I wake up in the morning and I have a weird kink and I know if I just spray a little bit of it, it’ll make it look like that’s on purpose.

AD: I use products by a brand called DevaCurl. I have to buy things that are made for people with kinky weird hair. It’s taken me so long to figure out my hair. For so long I hated my hair. It’s only been in recent years that I’ve started to actually look in the mirror and be like, “All right, I guess that’s grows out of my head and that’s cool!”