Paris Hilton shines in gold gown while showing off engagement ring at Cannes Fashion For Relief gala

Paris Hilton wowed in a gold sleeveless gown on Sunday night at the Cannes Fashion For Relief gala.

The 37-year-old Hilton heiress, who came dripping in diamonds, showed off her 20-carat, pear shaped engagement ring on the red carpet.

Fashion For Relief is a non-profit organization, lead by supermodel Naomi Campbell, that raises money for various causes.

Pretty princess: Paris Hilton wowed in a gold sleeveless gown by Christophe Guillarme on Sunday night at the Cannes Fashion For Relief gala

Pretty princess: Paris Hilton wowed in a gold sleeveless gown by Christophe Guillarme on Sunday night at the Cannes Fashion For Relief gala

What a rock: The 37-year-old Hilton heiress, who came dripping in diamonds, showed off her 20-carat, pear shaped engagement ring on the red carpet

What a rock: The 37-year-old Hilton heiress, who came dripping in diamonds, showed off her 20-carat, pear shaped engagement ring on the red carpet

Bling: Paris couldn't stop staring at her massive diamond 

Bling: Paris couldn’t stop staring at her massive diamond

The evening of glitz and glamour included a guest list of over 1,000 people.

Attendees enjoyed dinner, live entertainment, an auction, and a fashion show.

Hilton, who traveled to Cannes with fiance Chris Zylka, flew solo for the event.

Giving back: Fashion For Relief is a non-profit organization, lead by supermodel Naomi Campbell, that raises money for various causes

Giving back: Fashion For Relief is a non-profit organization, lead by supermodel Naomi Campbell, that raises money for various causes

All smiles: Hilton paired her ring with a diamond watch and choker  

All smiles: Hilton paired her ring with a diamond watch and choker

Cannes club: Paris is set to host and DJ a party at the VIP Room on Monday night in France 

Paris is set to host and DJ a party at the VIP Room on Monday night.

She made her DJ debut back in June 2012 and currently has a residency at Amnesia nightclub in Ibiza.

‘My first show was in Brazil. Like 30,000 people, closing for Jennifer Lopez, it was so much fun,’ she told Billboard in an interview.

‘I loved it so much that after that I really just got more into it. I’ve just been having the time of my life. I didn’t realize what a huge success I would be.’

Front row: The evening of glitz and glamour included a guest list of over 1,000 people

Front row: The evening of glitz and glamour included a guest list of over 1,000 people

Do a twirl: Paris, who traveled to Cannes with fiance Chris Zylka, flew solo for the event 

Do a twirl: Paris, who traveled to Cannes with fiance Chris Zylka, flew solo for the event

Fashion For Relief: Attendees enjoyed dinner, live entertainment, an auction, and a fashion show throughout the evening 

Fashion For Relief: Attendees enjoyed dinner, live entertainment, an auction, and a fashion show throughout the evening

The Simple Life star is in the process of planning her wedding to Zylka, 32.

During the iHeartRadio Music Awards, she revealed to ET that the pair plan to tie the knot later this year, but noted that picking a date has proved difficult due to her large family.

‘First we have the engagement party, the bridal party, and then the wedding,’ she said. ‘We’re still picking a date that’s perfect for everyone in the family. My brother is getting married in June so we’re gonna separate a few more months after that.’

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The Dresses — and Hats! — to Wear to a 2018 Kentucky Derby Viewing Party

Kentucky Derby

Princess Diana’s Cannes Dress Was Bluer Than the Sky and as Whimsical as a Dream

Princess Diana Cannes Film Festival Dresses

The Cannes Film Festival has always been one of the most glamorous events of the year, attracting Hollywood stars, models, and royalty alike. But while stars consistently shine thanks to the most incredible gowns, no one has marked the red carpet quite like Princess Diana.

Back in 1987, when she was just 26 years old, the Princess of Wales stunned everyone when she stepped out on the Croisette, wearing what has since become one of her most iconic outfits. As we watch to see what everyone wears this time around, read on to see the two Catherine Walker ensembles that Diana wore over 20 years ago.

For her first appearance on the Cannes Film Festival red carpet, Diana wore a puffy Catherine Walker dress with a double-breasted white blazer.

She accessorised her outfit with black-and-white pumps.

 

For her evening look, Princess Diana opted for an incredibly glamorous gown.

 

She accessorised it with a shawl and chandelier earrings.

Christina Aguilera’s Fashion Evolution

Finally, a Movie That Gets Prom Dresses Right

Like any person, I’m embarrassed by a lot of what I wore in high school. I look back in horror at the low-slung jeans and the layered tees. For what it’s worth, however, I got one thing right: My prom dress. I found it in a vintage store. It was a ’40s cut with a floral pattern on top and a floor-length, cream-colored skirt that hung straight. It was timeless and flattering and I probably should find a reason to re-wear it.

I flashed back to this outfit, and how proud I was of it, after seeing Kay Cannon’s Blockers. The comedy, about a group of parents trying to stop their daughters from losing their virginities on prom night, is hilarious, moving, and unusually smart about the various ways young women approach sex. It’s respectful of the three girls at its center, and that respect is evident in their prom ensembles. The outfits worn by Julie, Kayla, and Sam — played by Kathryn Newton, Geraldine Viswanathan, and Gideon Adlon — are distinctive and cute, reflecting their wearers’ burgeoning senses of style — just like mine, I’d say. In a movie full of butt-chugging and vomit gags, the fashion is taken refreshingly seriously.

With apologies to the costume designer of Pretty in Pink, the most famous movie prom dress is notable for being hideous. In 1986, Molly Ringwald’s Andie ruined a perfectly nice vintage dress with scissors, creating an ill-advised concoction of pink polka dots and inexplicably bare shoulders. Andie’s dress is unintentionally laughable, but other prom scenes aim for the ridiculous, like when Rose McGowan is outed as a murderer wearing an overwrought updo in Jawbreaker. Most school dance fashion on film, though, is disappointingly bland, filled with spaghetti straps and pastels. Carrie White’s slip dress is unimpressive before being covered with blood; Sandy Olsson’s hand jive attire is basic, white ’50s kitsch.

Photo: Universal Pictures

In Blockers the most traditional dress belongs to Julie, who, in many ways, has the most traditional story line. She’s the first to announce that she’s planning to have sex with her long term — for high school, anyway — boyfriend. She envisions rose petals on the bed and a very specific candle burning.

Costume designer Sarah Mae Burton says she assumed the character would consider her formalwear with the same amount of care. Burton — who was eager to do a prom movie — discovered in her research that today’s teens pour over Pinterest in planning their perfect evening. “I put together a mood board that wasn’t necessarily about the dresses in the images but the feeling they evoked and the sort of very romantic, glamorous evening that [Julie] would be preparing herself for,” she tells the Cut.

Julie’s the kind of girl with a Sixteen Candles poster on her wall. And, true to that ideal, her dress — a modification of a Nha Khanh design — has a full tulle skirt. But it’s also a bold red, almost a hint that unlike the heroine of that movie in pale pink, Julie isn’t going to wait around for a boy to whisk her away. She’s going to orchestrate her own destiny.

Photo: Universal Pictures

Kayla’s dress was chosen with that same sense of identity. Kayla’s life up until this moment has been defined by her athletic achievements. “I remember those girls from high school that you were like, Damn, I haven’t seen you wear anything but sweatshorts like ever,” Burton says. That’s Kayla, and her two-piece reflects that. She bares the most skin of any of her friends — to the dismay of her overprotective dad (John Cena) — but at the same time she’s showing off her physical accomplishments.

As Burton notes, the top has a sports bra feel. The material is sparkly and sturdy. It works in conjunction with Kayla’s chill but focused personality. She’s up for trying anything her druggie date has brought along, but she’s also totally in control. While she ultimately decides she’s not ready to have sex, she’s not going to completely deny her own pleasure. Instead, she suggests her dude go down on her. He does.

According to Burton, Sam was the hardest to dress. Of the trio, she has the most nuanced arc: She begins the film closeted, going along with her friends’ sex pact because she doesn’t want to be left out of their shared experience, but over the course of the night embraces her own desires. An early draft of the script noted that she had a crush on Tilda Swinton, so Burton first tried some asymmetrical, Swinton-esque gowns on her. But when Adlon tried on the Self Portrait gown she ended up wearing, her character came into focus. Its Wednesday Addams white collar and Edward Gorey color scheme nod to her interest in fantasy without being overt.

By contrast, Sam’s love interest Angelica (Ramona Young) fully embraces a Lord of the Rings aesthetic, wearing a cloak she designed for Galadriel cosplay. Initially, the script called for Angelica to wear a tuxedo, but Burton demurred: “The more we dug into it it was like, okay, why does the one [already out] gay female character have to be in men’s clothing? Why can’t she be in a beautiful dress?”

The realities of production required Burton to alter the off-the-rack items she found for Julie, Kayla, and Sam. All the skirts were cropped shorter since mobility is key in the hijink-heavy, sometimes messy plot. She also needed to wrestle up multiples, which sometimes meant frankensteining new dresses from pieces with similar fabric. Still, Burton wanted some element of verisimilitude. Kayla’s outfit came from Ellie Wilde, a prom line under bridal retailer Mon Cheri, and  extras wore gowns from brands like Sherri Hill and Rachel Allan. The dresses aren’t cheap exactly, but prom is a racket in the real world. (According to a Visa Inc. survey the average cost of prom was $919 in 2014.)  “We wanted to make sure that it was something that felt like they would actually have access to,” Burton says. “Perhaps they saved their allowance or their part time job money toward it.” The dresses don’t feel like they were plucked from the runway, but more crucially, they feel like looks the women wearing them would choose. Maybe in real life they wouldn’t fit quite so well, but I’m willing to accept a little movie magic.

Blockers works because it’s on the side of the high schoolers, and the parents are routinely called out for the insecurity that leads them on their mission. The movie never questions whether these girls are capable of making their own decisions about their bodies — when it comes to both sex and clothes.

Animals rights groups smell blood as fashion labels go fur-free

PARIS – Is this the beginning of the end for fur?

With more and more fashion houses going fur-free, San Francisco banning fur sales in the city and British MPs considering outlawing all imports of pelts after Brexit, the signs do not seem good for the industry.

After decades of hard-hitting campaigning against fur, animal rights activists believe they smell victory.

Last week Donna Karan and DKNY became the latest in a flood of luxury brands to say they were planning to go fur free, following similar announcements by Gucci, Versace, Furla, Michael Kors, Armani and Hugo Boss in recent months.

US-based animal rights group PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), which is famous for its spectacular anti-fur protests, declared that “2018 is the year that everyone is saying goodbye to fur.

“Times are changing and the end of fur farming is within reach!” it told its 687,000 Instagram followers.

The British-based Humane Society International said the tide turned when Gucci declared it was going fur-free in October. Another hammer blow came this month when Donatella Versace said that “I don’t want to kill animals to make fashion. It doesn’t feel right.”

“Such influential brands turning their backs on cruel fur makes the few designers like Fendi and Burberry who are still peddling fur look increasingly out of touch and isolated,” said the society’s president Kitty Block.

Fendi’s Karl Lagerfeld shows little sign of second thoughts, however, and has said he will use real fur as long as “people eat meat and wear leather”.

‘LEATHER IS NEXT’

But PETA, which also campaigns for veganism, has warned the leather industry that is also in its sights, saying “You are next…”

And Professor Nathalie Ruelle, of the French Fashion Institute, told AFP that it was telling that the new fur-free brands “did not say anything about exotic leathers (such as crocodile, lizard and snakeskin).”

Of the big designers, Stella McCartney, a vegetarian and animal rights activist herself, has pushed the ethical envelope the furthest, refusing to use fur, leather or feathers.

But vegans want to go further still, with a ban on all animal products, which for some also means wool.

But the fur industry is not taking this lying down and has become much more vocal in its bid to counter animal rights groups’ social media campaigns.

The International Fur Federation (IFF) took Gucci to task when it went fur-free, asking if it “really wanted to choke the world with fake plastic fur…”

Philippe Beaulieu, of the French fur federation claimed fur-free was a marketing gimmick “trying to surf on emotion” to please millennials.

Fake fur, he said, was the real danger to the environment. “Brands who stop fur push synthetic fur which comes from plastic, a byproduct of the petrol industry, with all the pollution and harm to the planet that that entails.”

CHINA’S PASSION FOR FUR

In contrast, fur is natural and more and more durable and traceable, he said.

Arnaud Brunois, of the Faux Fur Institute, which he set up to counter the IFF, disputes this.

He insisted that “from an ecological point of view it was better to use a waste product from oil… than farm 150 million of animals then skin them and finally treat the pelts with chemicals.”

“It is part of the real fur industry’s marketing campaign to denigrate faux fur,” he added.

These days imitation can sometimes pass for the real thing as the British designer Clare Waight Keller proved in her fake fur-heavy Givenchy show at Paris fashion week earlier this month.

Luxury brand expert Serge Carreira at Sciences Po university in Paris said “fur was marginal for most of the fashion houses who have stopped using it.”

For instance, it only accounted for 10 million euros ($12.3 million) of Gucci’s 6-billion turnover in 2017, or 0.16 percent.

While fur coats are now rarer on the streets of cities in the West, coats with fur collars — either fake or real, and sometimes a mixture of both, activists claim — are everywhere.

In China, however, the picture is very different.

Fur sales grew “phenomenally” there over the last decade, said IFF CEO Mark Oaten, and despite levelling off still dwarfs all those elsewhere combined.

The world’s biggest fur consumer is now also far by its it largest producer in a industry worth $30 billion globally in 2017.

Ava Nirui Gives Bootleg a Fashion Twist

Ava Nirui, a D.I.Y. fashion bootlegger, in the meatpacking district in Manhattan. Credit Andre D. Wagner for The New York Times

Name: Ava Nirui

Age: 26

Hometown: Sydney, Australia

Now Lives: In a modern three-bedroom apartment in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn that she shares with two friends.

Claim to Fame: Ms. Nirui is a self-described “luxury remixer” known for putting a D.I.Y. spin on designer labels, like a tank top made from Gucci garment bags and an asthma inhaler bedazzled with the Dior logo. Her high-low creations have won her fashion fans, including Marc Jacobs, who hired her to create a bootleg hoodie that purposely misspelled his name as “Mark Jacobes.” The $125 hoodies sold out in a single day last December. Ms. Nirui is also a writer, photographer and the digital editor at Helmut Lang. “I’ve kind of become obsessed with customizing things and the fact that I can pay $5 for a Chinatown hoodie and change the context so it has the same value as a $900 sweatshirt,” she said.

A post shared by ava (@avanope) on

Big Break: In 2015, the designer Demna Gvasalia was making waves with his Vetements x Champion capsule collection. Not wanting to spend $1,100 on a sweatshirt, Ms. Nirui dreamed up her own version: a black Champion hoodie with the Comme des Garçons logo embroidered using the hoodie’s iconic C. “I remember thinking it was so absurd that it was so expensive,” Ms. Nirui said. “So I decided, ‘No way. I’m just going to do my own.’” She posted her creation to Instagram and was flooded with messages from people wanting to buy it, including Chance the Rapper. She declined to sell it, which only stoked demand further. “It wasn’t about making money,” she said. “It was about taking a piece of history and reworking it into something nobody else could have.”

Latest Project: In January, the Museum of Modern Art enlisted Ms. Nirui to make a limited-edition hoodie for the closing of its exhibit “Items: Is Fashion Modern?” The hoodies were based on Maison Margiela’s numerical logo, and were given out to museumgoers for free.

Next Thing: While Ms. Nirui is planning more hoodies (she declined to name the designers she is collaborating with), she is branching into zines and other creative forms. Most recently, she created a line of Barbie doll outfits for the Miami street wear brand Stray Rats.

Bootleg for the Masses: MsNirui doesn’t consider her work as “ripping off other designers,” but as homage. “Brands like Louis Vuitton and Chanel, they’re the pinnacle of luxury, and things like that should be available to everyone,” she said. “If you can’t afford it, make it. If that’s what you want to wear, do it yourself.”