The coolest men’s fashion accessories for summer

Ebbets Fitted Seattle Cap for Glasswing, $45

Oyster Holdings Adidas 350, $130

Miansai Silver Hook Brown Leather Bracelet,$65 Stance Iron Maiden Socks, $18

 

Warby Parker Yates Sunglasses, starting at $145

Man does not live by jeans and shirts alone. It’s the little extras that set him apart.

Carefully chosen accessories complete a look, elevate your style and can serve a utilitarian purpose, too. These stylish extras complete your look and take your day (or night) wear to the next level.

Oyster Holdings Adidas 350 ($130 at Likelihood, Capitol Hill, and likelihood.us). Add some punch to your basics with these luxe sneakers in orange nubuck leather. They manage to be both flashy and classy, with a gold-foil logo and a semi-translucent outsole. But step it up — they’re already selling out across the country.

Stance Iron Maiden Socks ($18 at MysteryMade, West Seattle, and stance.com). Is he a rocker down to the tips of his toes? Run to the hills in these comfortable cushioned athletic socks from the California company’s Legends of Metal Collection, featuring Eddie art from Iron Maiden’s debut 1980 album.

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MEN’S FASHION RISKS THAT WILL ENSURE YOU STAND OUT FOR THE RIGHT REASONS

Colour Blocking

Bold colours are high on the risk list for many men, which makes the colour blocking trend feel particularly daunting. Colour blocking uses two or more solid segments of colour in a single outfit in a mix of warm, cool, or complementary tones.

Here is where the colour wheel from art class comes in handy.One approach to colour blocking blends shades from either a warm or cool palette, and anchors them with neutral tones. A second approach uses complementary/contrasting colours – opposites on the colour wheel – to give an outfit a bright but harmonious look.

Don’t be afraid to pair clashing colours, but mix no more than 3 or 4 in one ensemble.

White Suit

Believe it or not, you can rock a white suit without looking like Colonel Sanders, John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever, or anyone on the set of Miami Vice. It’s a dandified, devilishly stylish look that’s criminally underused.

Think of it as the summer equivalent of your grey and navy suits – a neutral that’s seasonally-appropriate and versatile. As per usual, the suit must be well-fitted first and foremost.

Then you’re free to experiment – team it with a tee for a dressed-down occasion, wear it with a gingham shirt for a more formal event, and separate the jacket and trousers for even more sartorial possibilities.

Two-Tone Shoes

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Two-tone shoes are a smart choice when you want to take a simple look to the next level with minimal effort. The most famous two-tone shoe is the spectator, allegedly first designed by legendary English footwear maker John Lobb.

Wearing a two-toned shoe adds a distinctly retro feel to a modern outfit, so avoid anything else with a vintage look unless you’re deliberately trying to create a costume. Otherwise, the footwear world is your oyster and you can be as audacious or as safe as you want to be in your colour choices. Consider mixing materials while you’re at it.

Colourful Socks

Socks are one of the smallest garments that can have a big impact on an outfit. They’re also one of the most inexpensive ways to rev up your getup. Block colours are the easiest place to start. Try to pick out accent colours in your look and contrast or complement your socks accordingly.

For slightly more advanced levels of sockery, try rocking a pair with a print or pattern. The sky’s nearly the limit, just don’t match a pattern that’s already in the rest of your look. If you’re wearing an argyle cardigan, save the argyle socks for another day.

Wearing Your Watch On The Outside Of Your Cuff

We can practically hear your confused cries of “Huh?” through the screen, but hear us out. On one hand, wearing a watch on the outside of your cuff looks innovative and unique – the perfect expression of sprezzatura. But on the other hand, it’s simply a practical move.

If your watch is on the outside, you don’t have to worry about it being too big to fit underneath and you don’t have to peel away your clothing in order to tell the time. Besides, why hide your carefully chosen timepiece beneath layers of fabric when you could show your good taste off?

Gilet Under Your Suit Blazer

During the cooler months, layering is the name of the game. The shirt-jumper-jacket look is most men’s go-to, but for the guy who’s looking for something a little more unusual, there’s another option: the gilet. The gilet can be worn as an outer layer, but it’s equally interesting (if not more so) as a mid-layer.

Look for one that’s fitted and not too puffy, then pop it between your shirt and your suit blazer for a new twist on office attire. Just remember to take it off when you get indoors. If you need more help check out our guide on how to wear the gilet with a blazer.

The Document Satchel (AKA Man Purse)

Your father carted around a bulky black briefcase. In your university days, you carried a nylon laptop bag (or maybe a messenger bag, if you were an especially stylish student). Neither of those will do now. Every man needs a reliable and sophisticated work bag. Throwing a backpack over your suit simply won’t do, nor will stuffing important papers into your pockets.

The answer is a document satchel, which is both functional and a stylish way of maintaining your professional image. If anyone dares call it a purse, tell them you can’t hear them over the sound of your corner office.

Wearing A Hat

The classic fedora hat catches a lot of flak these days, but well-dressed gents aren’t afraid to rock a hat no matter what the Internet says. First, familiarise yourself with the many hat styles available to you. If you think headgear begins and ends with the fedora, you have much to learn. Then figure out what works with your facial features and your hairstyle.

A hat is an adventurous, original accent – but remember that the hat doesn’t make the outfit, the hat completes the outfit. If the hat is wearing you, something needs to change.

10 beauty tips to treat acne breakouts in summer

Do not squeeze your pimples. This usually leads to further inflammation, which makes the acne look worse and last longer.

While cosmetics can cover up some facial flaws, it is tough to completely hide acne. Summer skin is prone to infections as dust, oil, heat and humidity tend to stick to your face resulting in acne, so make sure you are paying attention to it. Cosmetologist and homeopath physician Karuna Malhotra from Cosmetic Skin and Homeo Clinic and make-up artist Tullika Pandey list ways to prevent acne in summer:

* Wash your face only once or twice a day with lukewarm water, a mild cleanser, and gentle motion — no scrubbing or harsh abrasive products needed. Make sure one of those times you’re washing your face is in the evening, to remove make-up and dirt

* Do not squeeze your pimples. This usually leads to further inflammation, which makes the acne look worse and last longer. Also, this will leave a bad pigmented scar.

Avoid eating oily foods like chips and French fries as they contain saturated oils that increase cholesterol in the body. (Shutterstock)

* Avoid processed foods, generally high in saturated fats and transfats. It can lead to an increase in sebum production triggering acne.

* Also avoid oily foods like chips, French fries, pakodas, and aloo tikkis which taste good but contain saturated oils that increase cholesterol in the body, which leads to poor blood circulation and can worsen your acne.

* Fibre plays an important role in getting rid of body toxins. Eat cereals and fibre rich food and fruits such as blueberries and grapefruit to detoxify your body and clear your skin.

Don’t cover your face with layers of concealer. Instead, use complementary colours to blend in the blemishes. (Shutterstock)

* Include Vitamin A in your diet as it is a good source of carotenoids. Carrots, papaya, spinach, and tomato juice are a rich source of it.

* Stop use of foundation for a week. It can clear up acne breakouts, and stop rashes caused by irritating ingredients.

* Do not use make-up on acne skin, and if needed use non-comedogenic and non-irritating products.

* Don’t cover your face with layers of concealer. Instead, use complementary colours to blend in the blemishes.

The fallacy of the plus-size industry

In this week’s ‘For Style’s Sake’, we explore the fallacy of the plus-size industry and whether inclusivity is nothing but smoke and mirrors.

The fallacy of the plus-size industry (Pulse)

For Style’s Sake explores the fallacy of the burgeoning plus-size industry and examines whether plus-size models are a true representation of ‘the average woman’ or whether we have just been sold another dream parading as ‘the answer’.

For years, plus-size women were marginalised by the mainstream fashion industry despite a large percentage of women worldwide being over a US size 10. According to a study from the International Journal of Fashion Design, Technology and Education, the average American woman is between a size 16 to 18.

As society progressed and more marginalised groups are refusing to be ignored any longer, we noticed a shift and now brands are striving to be inclusive but how plus-size is plus-size?

According to the industry, plus-size is anything above a size 8. The majority of plus size models are no bigger than a UK size 12 and brands are projecting an image of largess that in reality isn’t very big at all. Again, bigger women find themselves of on the fringe of the very industry designed for them, or so they are told.

Years ago, plus-size women the world over struggled to find stylish, on-trend clothing. The fashion industry clung to the notion that bigger women just were not interested in fashion and brands, both high-street and high-end seldom catered for the demographic and those that did, did not provide anything fashion-forward. A subculture grew from the sheer frustration at the lack of options for bigger women and that’s how to plus-size fashion industry really grew its wings.

Plus-size brands began to spring up that catered solely to bigger women and not just any type of clothing, but clothing that closely mirrored what we saw in magazines and on models. It was such a powerful statement for the plus-size community who declared that their size had no bearing on their taste and the type of clothing they wanted to wear.

The plus-size industry thrived.

Mango launches plus-size range Violeta using ‘plus-size’ models (Mango)

Mainstream brands, keen to key into burgeoning markets noticed this and turned their attention to it. Slowly but surely, brands began to release plus-size capsule collections, first dipping their toes to test the waters. It was more lucrative than they could have possibly imagined.

On runways, in stores, even in the pages of style bibles such as Vogue magazinethe plus-size woman is finally getting some fashion respect, not because the industry has decided it’s OK to be big, but because it can no longer afford to ignore her. Retailers must find ways to grow and this is an irresistible market for them to tap into.

Plus-size model Ashley Graham bags the cover of UK Vogue shot by renowned photographer Patrick Demarchelier (Vogue)

However, it has quickly became clear that whilst they were projecting the idea of inclusivity, these brands talking the talk but not walking the walk.

There of course has been a paradigm shift somewhat, though not enough, as darker-skinned models, like Philomena Kwao, have not only found work but have also been massively successful in a market that was easing into the mainstream. Today the plus-size industry has, in many ways, eclipsed the fashion industry overall in its diversity and inclusivity. However, those stories are few and far between and for the most part, the plus-size industry has been merely co-opted by the main fashion industry and is trying to push a narrative that is not very far removed from the days of old.

The majority of plus-size models that are being promoted as such are barely above a size 12. The industry has managed to pervert what it means to be a plus-size model and are possibly causing more harm than good for the plus-size community. Women, looking at adverts are expecting to see models that they can finally relate to and in reality are seeing models who further compound their body image issues and cause them to question where exactly they belong, if anywhere at all.

Alex LaRosa, a self-proclaimed “plus-size model who’s visibly plus-size,” appeared on Huffpost Live to talk about some of her issues with these discrepancies:

In a world where you’re telling women that plus-size is sizes 4 and up, you’re causing body image issues. You’re causing unrealistic expectations that everyone, every woman, should be a size 4. To bring that into the plus-size community, where you’re using sizes 8, 10 and 12, when sometimes the stores don’t even start carrying the clothes until size 14, you’re telling women, ‘You want to look like these models. This is what you should look like, but it’s never going to happen.

Plus-size model Alex LaRosa
Plus-size model Alex LaRosa (Alex LaRosa)

The sad truth is plus-sized models’ bodies are headed in the opposite direction of actual plus-size women’s bodies.

Speaking to online platform The Revelist, plus-size model Tess Holliday spoke about how far the industry needs to go to recognise real women with different body shapes as well as sizes. She said:

I’m part of one of those under-represented, unseen groups: plus-size women. And I’m incredibly proud to be the first woman of my size (size 22) to be signed to a major modelling agency, and recognise that it was a milestone for an industry that is typically focused on thinness.

But right now, even in the plus-size part of the modelling world, there isn’t a ton of diversity in body shapes. Most plus-size models are taller than 5’8”, a size 10 or 12, and have an hourglass shape. Where are the other bodies with the shape of a blueberry, like mine? And where are the women with small busts or small butts?  

Change will only come, to models and beyond, if women keep demanding it.

Plus-size model and body positive activist Tess Holliday

Indeed, the plus-size industry has a long way to go to actually capture what it means to be a true plus-size woman. For many women who thought this movement would be the beginning of the end of years of otherness have found themselves once again, excluded.

Thanks to social media, voices reach further and the people have a platform to push their narratives and as Tess Holliday suggested, change will only come if it’s demanded.

The fashion industry might never be what we need it to be for every individual which is why it important that we understand the importance of creating our own narratives and being the change we wish to see.

 

 

 

 

Red carpet looks that dazzled Cannes

Actresses proved you can protest while being beautifully dressed (AFP Photo/LOIC VENANCE)

Actresses proved you can protest while being beautifully dressed

 

 

Cate Blanchett's spectacular blue Mary Katrantzou ball gown that took six months to make (AFP Photo/Valery HACHE)

Cate Blanchett’s spectacular blue Mary Katrantzou ball gown that took six months to make

Black and mixed-race French actresses lit up Cannes protesting the discrimination and stereotyping they have suffered (AFP Photo/Alberto PIZZOLI)

Black and mixed-race French actresses lit up Cannes protesting the discrimination and stereotyping they have suffered

Spike Lee dusted down his Love and Hate knuckleduster rings from "Do the Right Thing" for his "BlacKkKlansman" premiere (AFP Photo/Anne-Christine POUJOULAT            )

Spike Lee dusted down his Love and Hate knuckleduster rings from “Do the Right Thing” for his “BlacKkKlansman” premiere

Jury member Kristen Stewart threw off her stilettos and walked barefoot along the red carpet (AFP Photo/Valery HACHE)

Jury member Kristen Stewart threw off her stilettos and walked barefoot along the red carpet

Bollywood star Aishwarya Rai's peacock and butterfly-style gown had the longest train seen on the red carpet (AFP Photo/Anne-Christine POUJOULAT)

Bollywood star Aishwarya Rai’s peacock and butterfly-style gown had the longest train seen on the red carpet

Japanese actress Erika Karata had to be rescued twice by her co-stars when she got her heel stuck in her dress (AFP Photo/Valery HACHE)

Japanese actress Erika Karata had to be rescued twice by her co-stars when she got her heel stuck in her dress

 

 

Cannes (France) (AFP) – With two powerful protests by female stars calling for equal pay and treatment, the red carpet at the Cannes film festival — which ends Sunday — was about much more than fashion statements.

But that did not dim the glamour of the gala premieres. We look back on 12 days and nights of glitz, as well as the occasional wardrobe malfunction, on the French Riviera.

– Who’s wearing the trousers? –

The Cannes red carpet has seen a lot in 71 years. But few nights will live longer in the memory than the one when female stars led by jury president Cate Blanchett protested about the festival’s epic fail when it comes to women directors. All but 82 films of the near 1,700 shown at Cannes over the years have been by men.

This was also possibly the best-dressed demo in history, with Kristen Stewart rocking a white Chanel trouser suit and many others following #MeToo protests elsewhere by dressing in black. This was a Cannes where women wore the trousers — once frowned upon by the festival’s dress code — with Blanchett killing it with a black Givenchy jumpsuit for the premiere of “Capernaum”.

– Queen Cate –

No one does regal better than Blanchett who made her name playing British monarch Elizabeth I. Her intelligence and poise gave the festival a new sheen, from her speech at the protest to her insistence that the jury will chose the best film, not the one that best fits the political narrative.

Her wardrobe choices were equally impeccable at more than a dozen galas. Two black Armani numbers contrasted with an intricate avant-garde Iris van Herpen dress. And she brought the house down with a spectacular blue Mary Katrantzou ball gown that took six months to make. The dress also delivered the cutest photo of the festival when her daughter hid under her skirts as she left her hotel room.

– Black is back –

Black and mixed-race French actresses showed how to be angry and elegant in their protest on the red carpet about the shocking discrimination and stereotyping they have suffered. Dressed in Balmain they lit up Cannes on the wettest night of the festival and were clapped up the carpet by jury member Khadja Nin.

The Burundian singer has given Blanchett a run for her money with some seriously sassy wax print dresses and headwraps while Spike Lee dusted down his Love and Hate knuckleduster rings from “Do the Right Thing” for his “BlacKkKlansman” premiere.

– Kicking ass barefoot –

After “Heelgate” in 2015 when women were stopped on the red carpet for not wearing high heels, Cannes “sexist” dress code — since revised — took a bit of a kicking this year with jury member Kristen Stewart throwing off her stilettos and walking barefoot up the steps for “BlacKkKlansman”.

A few nights later she ground convention further into the dust with an androgynous black Chanel jacket and leather trousers and loafers. Italian director Alice Rohrwacher, whose quirky “Happy as Lazzaro” is in the running for the Palme d’Or top prize, took gender reversal to a new level by wearing a man’s shirt backwards for her press conference.

– Butterfly gothic –

Indian icon Aishwarya Rai and Iranian actress Marziyeh Rezaei wore two of the most photographed dresses — for very different reasons. The train of the Bollywood’s star’s peacock/butterfly Michael Cinco dress was the longest seen on the red carpet for many a year, while Rezaei’s was a spectacularly modest shimmering tulle number channelling the most gothic of fairytales.

– A slight snag… –

And you have to feel sorry for the super chic Japanese actress Erika Karata who had to be rescued not once but twice by her co-stars from “Asako 1 & 2” when she got her heel stuck in her dress on the famous Cannes red carpet.

Paris Hilton shines in gold gown while showing off engagement ring at Cannes Fashion For Relief gala

Paris Hilton wowed in a gold sleeveless gown on Sunday night at the Cannes Fashion For Relief gala.

The 37-year-old Hilton heiress, who came dripping in diamonds, showed off her 20-carat, pear shaped engagement ring on the red carpet.

Fashion For Relief is a non-profit organization, lead by supermodel Naomi Campbell, that raises money for various causes.

Pretty princess: Paris Hilton wowed in a gold sleeveless gown by Christophe Guillarme on Sunday night at the Cannes Fashion For Relief gala

Pretty princess: Paris Hilton wowed in a gold sleeveless gown by Christophe Guillarme on Sunday night at the Cannes Fashion For Relief gala

What a rock: The 37-year-old Hilton heiress, who came dripping in diamonds, showed off her 20-carat, pear shaped engagement ring on the red carpet

What a rock: The 37-year-old Hilton heiress, who came dripping in diamonds, showed off her 20-carat, pear shaped engagement ring on the red carpet

Bling: Paris couldn't stop staring at her massive diamond 

Bling: Paris couldn’t stop staring at her massive diamond

The evening of glitz and glamour included a guest list of over 1,000 people.

Attendees enjoyed dinner, live entertainment, an auction, and a fashion show.

Hilton, who traveled to Cannes with fiance Chris Zylka, flew solo for the event.

Giving back: Fashion For Relief is a non-profit organization, lead by supermodel Naomi Campbell, that raises money for various causes

Giving back: Fashion For Relief is a non-profit organization, lead by supermodel Naomi Campbell, that raises money for various causes

All smiles: Hilton paired her ring with a diamond watch and choker  

All smiles: Hilton paired her ring with a diamond watch and choker

Cannes club: Paris is set to host and DJ a party at the VIP Room on Monday night in France 

Paris is set to host and DJ a party at the VIP Room on Monday night.

She made her DJ debut back in June 2012 and currently has a residency at Amnesia nightclub in Ibiza.

‘My first show was in Brazil. Like 30,000 people, closing for Jennifer Lopez, it was so much fun,’ she told Billboard in an interview.

‘I loved it so much that after that I really just got more into it. I’ve just been having the time of my life. I didn’t realize what a huge success I would be.’

Front row: The evening of glitz and glamour included a guest list of over 1,000 people

Front row: The evening of glitz and glamour included a guest list of over 1,000 people

Do a twirl: Paris, who traveled to Cannes with fiance Chris Zylka, flew solo for the event 

Do a twirl: Paris, who traveled to Cannes with fiance Chris Zylka, flew solo for the event

Fashion For Relief: Attendees enjoyed dinner, live entertainment, an auction, and a fashion show throughout the evening 

Fashion For Relief: Attendees enjoyed dinner, live entertainment, an auction, and a fashion show throughout the evening

The Simple Life star is in the process of planning her wedding to Zylka, 32.

During the iHeartRadio Music Awards, she revealed to ET that the pair plan to tie the knot later this year, but noted that picking a date has proved difficult due to her large family.

‘First we have the engagement party, the bridal party, and then the wedding,’ she said. ‘We’re still picking a date that’s perfect for everyone in the family. My brother is getting married in June so we’re gonna separate a few more months after that.’

What dresses looked like the year you went to prom

>> Prom dresses through the years. Photo: Flickr/Janice Waltzer

 

1989: Scoop-Neck Dresses Scoop-neck dresses were all the rage in '89. Bonus points if they happened to be bright pink and worn with matching shoes. Photo: Flickr/grilled Cheese

1990: Rosettes Nothing says 1990 more than satin rosettes across the neckline of a prom dress. This girl even wore opera-length gloves for added drama. Photo: Flickr/Mai Le

2006: Strapless Dresses

Behold: four strapless dress-wearing girls in the same photo. Two gowns are pink, one is white, and one is red, but what they all have is common is that they are strapless and fabulous.

2007: Rhinestone Brooches Often found on halter-neck dresses, these rhinestone brooches were always in the same place — right on the bodice. Photo: Flickr/02 Nation

2007: Rhinestone Brooches

Often found on halter-neck dresses, these rhinestone brooches were always in the same place — right on the bodice.

2008: Strapless Minis Floor-length gowns are certainly not a requirement at prom, and in 2008 mini dresses had a moment in the spotlight. Props if they featured tulle overlay. Photo: Flickr/Thirty30 Photography

2008: Strapless Minis

Floor-length gowns are certainly not a requirement at prom, and in 2008 mini dresses had a moment in the spotlight. Props if they featured tulle overlay.

2009: Animal-Print Gowns Your 2009 prom was all about taking a trip on the wild side, because anything animal print – whether it was zebra, cheetah, or leopard, as seen here – could be found on a prom dress. Photo: Flickr/The People's Tribune

2009: Animal-Print Gowns

Your 2009 prom was all about taking a trip on the wild side, because anything animal print – whether it was zebra, cheetah, or leopard, as seen here – could be found on a prom dress.

 

2010: Tiered Dresses This trend was for all the girls who wanted that classic princess moment. After all, nothing says, "I'm fancy!" like a tiered gown. Photo: Flickr/Peter Cattell

2010: Tiered Dresses

This trend was for all the girls who wanted that classic princess moment. After all, nothing says, “I’m fancy!” like a tiered gown.

2011: Neutral Colors An unexpected departure from the traditional rhinestones, bold colors, and prints, neutral colors were a way to look so chic at prom — from the dress down to the peep-toe heels. Photo: Flickr/etaito

2011: Neutral Colors

An unexpected departure from the traditional rhinestones, bold colors, and prints, neutral colors were a way to look so chic at prom — from the dress down to the peep-toe heels.

2012: Floral Shoulders If you loved florals but didn't want to wear a flower print, odds are you opted for this style instead. Photo: Flickr/StretchyBill

2012: Floral Shoulders

If you loved florals but didn’t want to wear a flower print, odds are you opted for this style instead.

2013: Side Cut-Outs Side cut-outs had a moment this year, and they showed up on every prom dress – this orange gown twinning moment is basically proof. Photo: Flickr/Robert J. Castaldi, Sr

2013: Side Cut-Outs

Side cut-outs had a moment this year, and they showed up on every prom dress – this orange gown twinning moment is basically proof.

2014: High-Low Hemlines High-low hemlines really swept prom season in 2014. These dresses provided the perfect silhouette if you wanted to show off some leg (and your shoes!) but also wanted to wear a full-length gown. Photo: Flickr/Ruth E Photos

2014: High-Low Hemlines

High-low hemlines really swept prom season in 2014. These dresses provided the perfect silhouette if you wanted to show off some leg (and your shoes!) but also wanted to wear a full-length gown.

2016: Two-Piece Matching Sets Forget a dress! This was the year of wearing a two-piece prom look, like these embellished (and gorgeous!) matching top and skirt sets. Photo: Flickr/Don Heller

2016: Two-Piece Matching Sets

Forget a dress! This was the year of wearing a two-piece prom look, like these embellished (and gorgeous!) matching top and skirt sets.

2017: Leg Slits Dresses with leg slits popped up at proms in 2017, because let's face it: They make dancing SO much easier. Photo: Flickr/Jacob Szetela

2017: Leg Slits

Dresses with leg slits popped up at proms in 2017, because let’s face it: They make dancing SO much easier.